Trees – A (Dedicated to an olive tree climber)

come closer friend

come closer, friend

I’m afraid that there are not trees from the jungle but that’s nothing that a bit of time and money cannot solve (the hard part is to get the money XD) These trees are from the Andean Plateau and the valleys in the desert.

Four casual friends talk

four casual friends talk

I don't care I'm going to scape

I don’t care. I am scaping now!

isolated a

isolated

above the city a tree wants to be free

above the city a tree wants to be free

forest of succa aya

forest of Succa Aya

No time for rest

no time for rest

Now is time to grow up

now is time to grow up

I want to touch the sky

I want to touch the sky

three with tree fingers

three with tree fingers

let yourself go

let yourself go

serene march

serene march

hey cross what are you doing

hey, Cross! what are you doing?!

tired trees

tired trees

can you hear us

Can you hear us?!

Cúpula entrevista

cúpula entrevista

Sombras

shadows

 

And that’s all for today, I hope you find one akin to your spirit ;-)

A thin line of yellow flowers

a thin line of yellow flowers

Probably the lady is typing or reading a sms in her cell phone. The colorful fabric in her back is an aguayo, every place has its own design so I can see if a lady comes from Puno, Cuzco, La Paz, Huancavelica, and a few distant cities more. Usually the designs from Bolivia are less colorful, to Bolivians instead our designs have so much color in them. The hat is an style women adopted when British came to build trains and railways in the nineteenth century. I’m not sure if the hats we men use have the same origin. Women use more or less the same clothing as in thousands of years ago. After the rebellion of a nobleman in the end of the eighteenth century, Tupac Amaru II, Spaniards decided that men shouldn’t use our symbols or style so we had to dress like Spanish peasants (lol), so there is no sense to us to use traditional cloths because those belong to another reality.

Falling cross

falling cross

But don’t throw the water of the Looooord!

The first time I went to Machu Picchu (until now I’ve went thrice) I was nine years old if I’m not wrong. Parents gave a camera to a lady that probably had a problem in her hands, because I think she couldn’t have more than sixty years of age, but they had a terrible tremble. That was the first time I could have a bit of money and bought a disposable film camera that I couldn’t use because it was needed more money for the rolls of film and the development.

She was extraordinarily catholic, not in the way as people in Puno use to be, I mean mixing Catholicism with the own religion, but she was strictly Catholic. When we were in the Sacred Valley I was thirsty and there was a little waterfall, I asked to the lady with the camera of my parents if I could drink from that water and she exclaimed “Of course! That’s Lord’s Water”, I still can remember that she pronounced it with capitals :D, I understood that the water was from the lord or owner of that part of the valley and guessed she was afraid that him could have heard my offending question. In the afternoon I noted that I was catching a cold and the water felt freeze so I threw it, suddenly I noticed the lady was staring me with surprised and shocked eyes and a shadow of anger. Late I realized that her “lord” was her Lord Jesus…

In my defense, because I try to be careful to don’t offend the beliefs of others, I can’t imagine why Jesus would be the owner of a land unknown to anybody from the Middle East until a few centuries ago…

The lady perhaps paid me because that, at the end of the travel, with blurred photographs mostly about my classmates XP