Living monuments

I liked the scene: the sunset was ending so fast… and the bird in the center and the gentlemen talking instead seemed to play a game to be statues, quiet in their eternity of silhouettes of a red sun.

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18 thoughts on “Living monuments

      1. Birds are more impatient than old men, who pray for time to stand still, so they may live just a little while longer :) OMG, this may be another poem in the making! haha

      2. I was having a busy time these days. I read it but I couldn’t give me time to answer you, not in a rush but with all my gratitude.
        Thanks Rose for your art that transmutes word of conversations in amazing poems ^_^

    1. I know you lived also in the coastline, Are the sunsets there in the same way as in Ilo? I wonder because I am not sure if it has awoken a memory in you or a discovering ^.^

      1. You know Francis, Montreal is an island. In the St-Lawrence River, which is not very wide in Montreal – we can see both sides of the river until we get quite a bit north We do have nice sunsets on the city, and some very magical ones, but they’re not the same as by the sea. I have seen quite a few sunsets on seashores in my life though. In North Carolina for example, when I was camping in a little fishing town called Frisco, on an very long arm of land called Cape Hatteras – when you are on west side of the estuary, it’s like being on a western coast – the sun goes down on what seems like infinite water (it’s fifty miles from the mainland). I also saw beautiful sunsets in my life on the west coast of Canada. But when I lived there, in British Columbia I mean, I was in the mountains, not by the sea… I have also seen them in a few other countries throughout my life and travels. But I never lived on a sunset coast as such.

        Also, I have been meaning to tell you about northern lights. You’ve mentioned them twice now (aurora borealis)… You know, I’ve only really seen once in my life what I would call a real one. It was mostly red and incredibly beautiful and magical. It happened quite many years ago, where I was living at the time, an hour east of Montreal. I remember it like a big red moving doorway to the sky. But in this part of Quebec, it remains a very rare occurrence. We live much too close to the equator to see them, or rather too far away from the northern hemisphere. Aurora borealis are mostly above the 65 degrees latitude and Montreal is at 45 degrees…
        Have a wonderful day, Francis. Under your sky, your sun and your moon, and by your pacific waters, those of the planet and those of your soul… ^_^

      2. I read with interest how the geography of Montreal made it a military strategic point in the US independence war. You could make a beautiful map with your travels. Have you read “Atlas” by Borges? It’s a book he wrote when blind his thoughts, with a photograph (taken by her wife Maria Kodama, he was almost blind but he could see besides de yellow with the eyes of his lectures) I’ll translate for you his words about a piece of Canada in Buenos Aires, probably have you read it already but if not I hope it’s a surprise:
        “The totem”
        “Plotinus of Alexandria, tells Porfirius, refused to get portraited, alleged that he was just the shadow of his Platonic prototype and the portrait would be the shadow of a shadow.
        Centuries after Pascal would rediscover that argument against the art of painting. The photograph we see here is the copy of a Canadian idol, I mean, the shadow of the shadow of a shadow. Its original, let’s call it like that, stands, tall and without worship, in the back of the last of the three train stations in Retiro. It’s an official gift of the government of Canada. That country doesn’t care to be represented for that barbaric image. A South American government wouldn’t dare the gamble to give the image of an anomymous and rough divinity.
        We know these things and nevertheless our imagination is pleased with the idea of a totem in the desert, about a totem that obscurely demands mythologies, tribes, seizures and perhaps even sacrifices. Nothing we know about its worship, a reason to dream it in the doubtful twilight”.

        I am so sorry to have assumed about the auroras… I should have investigated better. At least I am happy to know what you saw. Did you see that the cameras exaggerate the colors of auroras? In your narration I feel for first time I have seen an aurora, thank you, thank you, thank you ^_^

        You would love Ilo city, if you haven’t been long enough in the coast you would enjoy it: it’s not touristic, the blue ships of fishermen always in the coast (and they can take you to visit the coast with the sea lions and natural resesrves) the long beaches where even Francis Drake arrived and your reader Francis would take photographs centuries after, the tranquil port and the food with fish barely fished from the sea… and the summer is quite warm and even the winters are mildly warm, I know you are a summer lady ;)

        Thanks for your presence, Caroline D (I love your “D” it’s like a laugh in :D so I always think in you happy) Hoping you have a wonderful day as well, in your dear mountain, rivers and forests of Montreal. A hug and a smile ^_^

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